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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002)

A New Power Is Rising.

Original Title : Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The
Director : Peter Jackson
Writer : J.R.R. Tolkien
Frances Walsh
Philippa Boyens
Stephen Sinclair
Peter Jackson
Genre : Fantasy
Adventure
Country : USA
Language : English
Producer : Peter Jackson , Michael Lynne , Mark Ordesky , Barrie M. Osborne , Rick Porras , Jamie Selkirk , Robert Shaye , Frances Walsh , Bob Weinstein , Harvey Weinstein
Music : Howard Shore
Frances Walsh
Photography : Andrew Lesnie
Distributor : New Line Cinema [us]
MPAA Rating : Rated PG-13 for epic battle sequences and scary images.
IMDB ID : 0167261
Official site : http://www.derherrderringe-film.de/
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poster for "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The" by Peter Jackson (2002)
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
 

Starring

Bruce Allpress Aldor
Elijah Wood Frodo
Elijah Wood Frodo
 

Plot

The Fellowship has been broken. Boromir (Sean Bean) is dead, Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) and Samwise Gamgee (Sean Astin) have gone to Mordor alone to destroy the One Ring, Merry (Dominic Monaghan) and Pippin (Billy Boyd) have been captured by the Uruk-hai, and Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Legolas (Orlando Bloom), and Gimli (John Rhys-Davies) have made friends of the Rohan, a race of humans that are in the path of the upcoming war, led by its aging king, Théoden (Bernard Hill). The two towers between Mordor and Isengard, Barad-dúr and Orthanc, have united in their lust for destruction. The corrupt wizard Saruman (Christopher Lee), under the power of the Dark Lord Sauron, and his slimy assistant, Gríma Wormtongue (Brad Dourif), have created a grand Uruk-hai army bent on the destruction of Man and Middle-earth. The rebellion against Sauron is building up and will be led by Gandalf the White (Sir Ian McKellen), who was thought to be dead after the Balrog captured him. One of the Ring's original bearers, the creature Gollum (Andy Serkis), has tracked Frodo and Sam down in search of his 'precious', but is captured by the Hobbits and used as a way to lead them to Mt. Doom. The War of the Ring has now begun... Sauron's forces increase. His allies grow. The Ringwraiths return in an even more frightening form. Saruman's army of Uruk Hai is ready to launch an assault against Aragorn and the people of Rohan. Yet, the Fellowship is broken and Boromir is dead. For the little hope that is left, Frodo and Sam march on into Mordor, unprotected. A number of new allies join with Aragorn, Gimli, Legolas, Pippin and Merry. And they must defend Rohan and attack Isengard. Yet, while all this is going on, Sauron's troops mass toward the City of Gondor, for the War of the Ring is about to begin. Frodo and Sam take Gollum prisoner and continue on to Mordor on the mission to destroy The One Ring. Whilst their former companions Strider, Legolas, Gimli, Merry and Pippin make new allies in the Ents, The Riders of Rohan and the Stewards of Gondor and launch an assault on Isengard. All the while a growing Shadow falls upon Middle-earth as the Dark Lord's Army marches on to Gondor. The War of the Ring has begun. After the fellowship has broken, Merry and Pippin, taken by orcs, make new allies in the Ents, while Legolas, Gimli and Aragorn make allies in the people of Rohan, and all of them must launch an assault on Isengard. Meanwhile, Frodo and Sam force Gollum to guide them through Mordor, trusting him with their lives.
 

Comments

Tepid Two Towers New hideous beasts join the Balrog and Orcs as audience members return to Middle Earth during Director Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood), Gandalf the White (Ian McKellen), Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), and five other members of the original Fellowship continue their arduous journey to Mordor to destroy the Ring.Conditions are often intolerable.Powers clash and collide.The battles are fierce and unrelenting.Friendships and alliances are tested.Innocent people and brave warriors lose their lives.Love is found and lost and unreturned.The world is simply a darker place.But even this enormous amount of conflict and drama does not engender a superior sequel to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. The team of screenwriters (Frances Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair, and Peter Jackson) undeniably undertook a difficult task in reproducing J.R.R. Tolkien's epic in script form, but this fact does not excuse the film's slow pace and occasional incomprehensibility.Both major and minor characters are introduced too quickly and little or no time is invested in many of these people, which prevents audience members from connecting and sympathizing with the characters.Théoden (Bernard Hill) orders elderly men and young boys to fight an impossible war, but one cannot connect with the weeping women or terrified men as leaders outfit them in helmets and swords and send them off to a likely death.The writers have not given audience members the time or reason to care. The overriding theme in The Lord of the Rings is that the good in the world is worth a tremendous fight and that evil cannot prevail despite its overwhelming force, but other themes evolve through various characters and subplots.Few people can miss the dominating theme, Sam Gamgee (Sean Astin) even states this Truth at the end of The Two Towers just in case it has eluded anyone in the story's first six cinematic hours.Unfortunately, many other themes are lost not simply because of exclusion from the original text, but again, because the writers did not invest enough time in explaining the details and significance of certain events.Allowing Galadriel (Cate Blanchett) to return momentarily to clarify certain points and clever monologues by Gollum (voice of Andy Serkis) avoid complete disregard for intelligibility, but more of these not-entirely-innovative but nonetheless helpful techniques would have benefited the film. Gollum embodies the possibility that any inherently good creature can be transformed into something evil.The entire cast delivers laudable performances once again, but this computer generated character steals the spotlight in every one of his scenes.He appears deformed and acts maliciously, but the writers gave him a tremendous amount of depth and so his deformities and deviance is forgiven.Gollum is complicated, and he is endearing.He has become a slave to the desire for power, but traces of his former Sméagol self penetrate his dominating ugliness--especially in an intense but entertaining forest monologue. Unfortunately, Gollum also represents the most disturbing reality of the second part of this film series: The Two Towers relies too heavily on its computer generated characters and special effects and not enough on the story and the abilities of its human actors.Legolas Greenleaf (Orlando Bloom) prances off boulders and dramatically flies onto a horse during battle, which elicits laughter during serious moments and detracts from Bloom's natural ability to play the part.The Fellowship of the Ring is not entirely void of these non-human creations, but the focus is on the nine-member Fellowship.The actors are responsible for the overall success or failure of each scene in the first film, but the exact opposite is true for the second film and pure spectacle does not afford cinematic greatness. Jackson's talented cast is not as present in The Two Towers, but they make a valiant effort to carry the film even through too numerous sweeping landscape scenes.Still, few of the actors exhibit flawless or even nearly flawless performances.Wood and John Rhys-Davies, who plays Gimli, occasionally overreact with melodramatic reactions and facial expressions, though it is admittedly the exception to Wood's otherwise skillful and intriguing performance.Rhys-Davies is particularly guilty of this amateurish act, however, and these poor acting choices coupled with a script that portrays him as a fool cheapens the overall story and discredits the Fellowship.The most troubling acting problem, however, is the lack of chemistry between the lead male characters excluding the hobbits.Every single leader is captivating in his individual monologues and scenes, but their camaraderie seems forced and unauthentic.The camera does most of the work, and the actors rely on background music and other visual effects to compensate for their collective inefficiency.Thankfully, the believability of all other relationships balances this inadequacy, and newcomer Miranda Otto as Éowyn shines. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers lags behind its predecessor, but Jackson and his cast and crew have created another film well worth the price of a movie ticket.The story begs for more explanation and the actors are undermined by technology, but the special effects and computer generated characters will keep audience members content through the three hour duration.One Ring was forged to bind all creatures in the darkness of Mordor--despite the film's faults, don't be the only one to miss this continued journey that will determine if the dark prophecy will come true and send Middle Earth into catastrophic ruin.
 
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
poster for "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The"
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
poster for "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The"
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
poster for "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The"
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
poster for "Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The"
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The (2002) - Peter Jackson
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