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Brother (2000)

The One Guy You Trust To Get Your Back When A Whole City's Trying To Put A Bullet In It.

Original Title : Brother
Director : Takeshi Kitano
Writer : Takeshi Kitano
Genre : Crime
Thriller
Country : USA
Language : English & Japanese
Producer : Ann Carli , Shinji Komiya , Masayuki Mori , Jeremy Thomas , Peter Watson , Takio Yoshida
Music : Jô Hisaishi
Photography : Katsumi Yanagishima
Distributor : Office Kitano [jp]
MPAA Rating : Rated R for pervasive strong violence, language and brief nudity.
IMDB ID : 0222851
Official site : http://bacfilms.com/brother
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poster for "Brother" by Takeshi Kitano (2000)
Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
 

Starring

Takeshi Kitano Aniki Yamamoto (as 'Beat' Takeshi
Omar Epps Denny
Kuroudo Maki Ken (as Claude Maki
 

Plot

A Japanese Yakuza gangster is exiled to the United States. Takeshi settles in Los Angeles where his younger, half brother lives and finds that although the turf is new, the rules are still the same as they try to take over the local drug trade.
 

Comments

The steering wheel comes off in Beat Takeshi's hands The Japanese writer-director-star Takeshi Kitano is not in control of his material in this L.A.-set gangster mini-epic. He doesn't get L.A., he doesn't get America in general, he doesn't seem to get black people or Mexican-Americans or their sense of humor or the way they talk. (Forget about how he renders white Angelenos.) And yet this almost surreally bloody yakuza picture has a fuzzy, out-of-focus nobility. The theme is the contrast between L.A. sleaze and the stoical, self-sacrificing, yet neurotically morbid code of the Japanese mob. As in previous Kitano--especially his best two pictures, VIOLENT COP and BOILING POINT--the roots of yakuza culture in Japanese antiquity, in long-lost art and religion, is rigorously limned. And here, that Mishima-like pathology is held up against the crud of downtown L.A. At moments, this has the effect of seeming like a cross between two Paul Schrader pictures--THE YAKUZA and HARDCORE. At others, it just seems as if Kitano isn't sure what he's doing. (The zany sense of geography will make L.A. viewers split their sides.) Kitano loves sequences that feel like big wooden blocks falling onto your lap and slightly hurting your knees. Movement in composition and grace in editing are not Kitano's speed. His pictures are composed of long, ungainly shots that are like an idiot's slackjawed stare, they thunk one into the other like a ten-ca pileup. Combined with Kitano's first use of ear-splitting Dolby stereo, this has the effect of an insane, Sensurround-like jarringness. Kitano's wacky deadpan humor and his fecklessness about amassing a colossal pile of corpses have a lovable defiance--I'm nuts, and I don't care who knows it! But isn't that the subliminal message of all Kitano's films--especially the G-rated, unwatchable ones?
 
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
poster for "Brother"
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Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
poster for "Brother"
400 x 569
Brother (2000) - Takeshi Kitano
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