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300 (2006)

Prepare for glory!

Original Title : 300
Director : Zack Snyder
Writer : Zack Snyder
Kurt Johnstad
Michael Gordon
Frank Miller
Lynn Varley
Genre : Action
Drama/History/War
Country : USA
Language : English
Producer : Steve Barnett, Mark Canton, Wesley Coller, William Fay, Craig J. Flores, Bernie Goldmann, Scott Mednick, Frank Miller, Gianni Nunnari, Josette Perrotta, Nathalie Peter-Contesse, Jeffrey Silver, Deborah Snyder, Silenn Thomas, Thomas Tull, Ben Waisbren
Music : Tyler Bates
Photography : Larry Fong
Distributor : Warner Bros. Pictures, Facets Multimedia Distribution, Fox-Warner, Sandrew Metronome Distribution Sverige AB, Sandrew Metronome, Warner Bros. Domestic Television Distribution, Warner Bros., Warner Bros., Warner Bros., Warner Bros., Warner Bros., Warner Bros., Wa
MPAA Rating : Rated R for graphic battle sequences throughout, some sexuality and nudity.
IMDB ID : 0416449
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poster for "300" by Zack Snyder (2006)
300 (2006) - Zack Snyder
 

Starring

Gerard Butler King Leonidas
Lena Headey Queen Gorgo
Dominic West Theron
David Wenham Dilios
Vincent Regan Captain
Michael Fassbender Stelios
Tom Wisdom Astinos
Andrew Pleavin Daxos
Andrew Tiernan Ephialtes
Rodrigo Santoro Xerxes
Giovani Cimmino Pleistarchos (as Giovani Antonio Cimmino)
Stephen McHattie Loyalist
Greg Kramer Ephor
Alex Ivanovici Ephor
Kelly Craig Oracle Girl
Eli Snyder Leonidas at 7 / 8 yrs
Tyler Max Neitzel Leonidas at 15 yrs (as Tyler Neitzel)
Tim Connolly Leonidas' Father
Marie-Julie Rivest Leonidas' Mother
Sebastian St. Germain Fighting Boy (12 years old)
Peter Mensah Messenger
Dennis St John Spartan Baby Inspector
Neil Napier Spartan with Stick
Dylan Smith Sentry
Maurizio Terrazzano Sentry
Robert Paradis Spartan General
Kwasi Songui Persian
Alexandra Beaton Burned Village Child
Frédéric Smith Statesman
Loucas Minchillo Spartan Baby A
Nicholas Minchillo Spartan Baby B
Tom Rack Ephor
David Francis Ephor
James Bradford Ephor
Andrew Shaver Free Greek-Potter
Robin Wilcock Free Greek-Sculptor
Kent McQuaid Free Greek-Blacksmith
Marcel Jeannin Free Greek-Baker
Jere Gillis Spartan General
Jeremy Thibodeau Spartan Boy
Tyrone Benskin Persian Emissary
Robert Maillet Uber Immortal (Giant)
Patrick Sabongui Persian General
Leon Laderach Executioner
Dave Lapommeray Persian General Slaughtered
Vervi Mauricio Armless Concubine
Charles Papasoff Blacksmith
Isabelle Champeau Mother at Market
Veronique-Natale Szalankiewicz Daughter at Market (3 / 5 years old)
Maéva Nadon Girl at Market
David Thibodeau Boy
David Schaap Potter
Jean Michel Paré Other Council Guard
Stewart Myiow Persian General
Andreanne Ross Concubine
Sara Giacalone Concubine
Ariadne Bourbonnière Kissing Concubine
Isabelle Fournel Kissing Concubine
Sandrine Merette-Attiow Contortionist
Elisabeth Etienne Dancer
Danielle Hubbard Dancer
Ruan Vibegaard Dancer
Genevieve Guilbault Slave Girl
Bonnie Mak Slave Girl
Amélie Sorel Slavegirl
Caroline Aspirot Slave Girl
Gina Gagnon Slave Girl
Tania Trudell Slave Girl
Stéphanie Aubry Slave Girl
Mercedes Leggett Slave Girl
Atif Y. Siddiqi Transsexual (Arabian)
Stephania Gambarova Slave Girl
Chanelle Lamothe Slave Girl
Sabrina-Jasmine Guilbault Slave Girl
 

Plot

It is spring 480 BC, Persian King Xerxes, continuing his father Darius' master plan to conquer the Hellenic city-states, arrives in Hellas. The previous Persian invasion and diplomatic attempts have already turned most northern Hellas tribes and states to the Persian side. But the people of Athens and Sparta, the largest Hellenic powers at the time, feel quite insulted by the Persian emissaries' request to surrender to Xerxes, and so slay them. In Sparta, King Leonidas consults the local oracle, who gives two options: Either a spartan king will have to be sacrificed, or Sparta will be burned to the ground. A year earlier (481, BC) a Panhellenic consortium of all southern city-states had already recognized the superiority of the Spartan army (the best organized and trained army at the time) and had declared King Leonidas as supreme commander of the combined Hellenic army. It is then decided that a small force should block Xerxes' way to southern Hellas in the Thermopylae passage. This passage was, at that time, 12 meters wide. The great historian Herodotus, possibly exaggerating, states that there were 1,700,000 Persians (their true number could have been anywhere from 100,000 to 1,000,000) against 7,000 Hellenic hoplites and slaves, including the 300 men of the Spartan King elite guard. King Xerxes waited four days for the Hellenes to be frightened and eventually surrender and was quite astonished by his opponents' complete apathy. Xerxes tried to convince Leonidas to drop weapons, give up his position, kneel before him and live on as a local governor under Xerxes. King Leonidas replied "molon lave," which means "Come and get them." The three-day battle began, with the 300 Spartans and 700 Thespians (the other Hellenes where sent by Leonidas to protect passages to their flanks) slaying thousands of Persians with minimal losses. The whole Persian campaign would have failed if it hadn't been for Efialtes, who showed Xerxes a secret passage to the Hellenic flanks. After a final battle led by King Xerxes himself, the Hellenic force was slain and their heroism and glory was written forever in history. From the beginning of the battle, the Hellenes buried their dead in the spot where they fell. Then battle signs where made for the dead of each Hellenic faction. For the Pelloponisians, (including the 300 Spartans) the sign generally read (free translation) "In this place 4,000 Pelloponisians fought 30 millions)." For the 300 Spartans (Lakaedaemonians), the sign reads (free translation) "Oh foreigner, tell the Lakaedaemonians that we are buried here obeying their laws," meaning that they never hesitated and never retreated from the enemy. The impact of the battle was enormous for both sides. The Persians' morale dropped to zero, and the Hellenes lost their fear for the Persian conqueror and organized their defense. After several successful battles, the Hellenes ultimately defeated the Persian army and repelled their invasion in the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC. When the ambitious King Xerxes of Persia invades Greece with his huge army to extend his vast slave empire, the brave Ling Leonidas brings his personal body guard army composed of three hundred warriors to defend the passage of Thermopylae, the only way by land to reach Greece. Using courage and the great battle skill of his men, he defends Thermopylae until a treacherous Greek citizen tells King Xerxes a secret goat passage leading to the back of Leonidas's army. Meanwhile, his wife Queen Gorgo of Sparta tries to convince the council to send the Spartan army to fight against the Persians. Based on Frank Miller's graphic novel, "300" concerns the 480 B.C. Battle of Thermopylae, where the King of Sparta led his army against the advancing Persians, the battle is said to have inspired all of Greece to band together against the Persians, and helped usher in the world's first democracy. In the Battle of Thermopylae of 480 BC an alliance of Greek city-states fought the invading Persian army in the mountain pass of Thermopylae. Vastly outnumbered, the Greeks held back the enemy in one of the most famous last stands of history. Persian King Xerxes lead a Army of well over 100,000 (Persian king Xerxes before war has about 170,000 army) men to Greece and was confronted by 300 Spartans, 700 Thespians and other Slave soldiers. Xerxes waited for 10 days for King Leonidas to surrender or withdraw left with no options he moved. The battle lasted for about 3 days and after which all 300 Spartans were killed. The Spartan defeat was not the one expected as a local shepherd named Ephialtes defected to the Persians and informed Xerxes of a separate path through Thermopylae, which the Persians could use to outflank the Greeks. In 480 BC, the Persian king Xerxes sends his massive army to conquer Greece. The Greek city of Sparta houses its finest warriors, and 300 of these soldiers are chosen to meet the Persians at Thermopylae, engaging the soldiers in a narrow canyon where they cannot take full advantage of their numbers. The battle is a suicide mission, meant to buy time for the rest of the Greek forces to prepare for the invasion. However, that doesn't stop the Spartans from throwing their hearts into the fray, determined to take as many Persians as possible with them.
 

Comments

This film isn't for all people. That's to say about a lot of movies in general of course, but this one in particular brings up a big clashing point between critics, What do we want to see in our movies? What is more important, to portray a fictional setting for the sake of giving people a mind blowing visual experience or to amuse and amaze them with clever plot twists and intelligent dialogs?First lets analyze what exactly this film is made of. Basically, the whole thing is just one epic fighting scene after another. Most noticeably is the camera work and the visual effects. Every shot seems like it was intended to be a work of art. The colors, the characters, the costumes, the backgrounds... every little detail has been given so much attention. During the big fights you'll also instantly notice the unique editing. There are a lot of "time slowdowns" throughout the battles which show what exactly is happening. Fatal wounds that slowly leak blood spatters in the air, decapitated heads traveling in slow-motion across the screen... it's all there. The story on the other hand isn't very complicated, in the sense that the whole movie could probably be described in a sentence or two. The dialogs are simple and most often talk about moral values like freedom and honor. If you would look at the script, it would probably look like another movie that has nothing more to offer then idealistic visions of how life should be.Reviewers of this title seem to be split up in two groups. They either love it with passion calling it an epic movie of the 21th century, or hate it even more and throw it off like a piece of garbage consisting of mindless action and silly cliché phrases. I feel reluctant to take a position in this argument. Normally it's tolerable to weigh out both sides of this matter to result in a fair judgment about a movie. Not in this one. On the one hand the visual are surely among the best to be witnessed in a movie. Every detail, every background, every special effect set to the scenes are so mindblowingly stunning. On the other hand the plot and dialogs are of the most simplistic and quite frankly dumb kind. "I fight for freedom! I'd rather die in honor then live in shame!" Sounds familiar? Of course it could be debated that this movie was never intended in the first place to have a unique plot that makes your head spin. But from an objective point of view it's still lacking in this department, so it should be noted.Now that's fine and all, but does that all make of the film? Is it worth watching or what? I think it is. For me the good outweighs the bad by miles. From the second the movie started it grabbed me and didn't let go. Every battle, every scene of the movie had me at the tip of my chair. Everything from the strong acting to the wondrous visuals to the war-shouts of the soldiers was just so stunning... it was truly a wonderful experience.I did not one single moment felt like the movie lacked anything. But I could imagine why other people did.So here's the deal.If you are easily impressed by beautiful landscapes, wonderful camera-work and editing and powerful acting then go see this. Right. Now. You'll be missing out if you don't. There is so much to see, so much power in the way this comic is translated to the big screen... It'll leave you in awe.However, you are looking for a good story, clever plot twists, some innovating to the world of the movies then skip this. 300 contains nothing of this, nor does it wants to give you this. I enjoyed this movie so much, but I know there will be people that will pass of as rubbish, and that's understandable. Just be sure to make up your mind about what you want to see when you go to the theater yourself instead of being drawn into bias by the tons of reviews this site has to offer.
 
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