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Early Works (Dear Phone, Water Wrackets, A Walk Through H) (1978)

Original Title : Walk Through H: The Reincarnation of an Ornithologist, A
Director : Peter Greenaway
Writer : Peter Greenaway
Genre : Short
(more)
Country : UK
Language : English
Music : Michael Nyman
Photography : John Rosenberg
Bert Walker
IMDB ID : 0078473
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poster for "Early Works (Dear Phone, Water Wrackets, A Walk Through H)" by Peter Greenaway (1978)
Early Works (Dear Phone, Water Wrackets, A Walk Through H) (1978) - Peter Greenaway
 

Starring

Colin Cantlie Narrator
Colin Cantlie Narrator
 

Plot

An anonymous narrator outlines a bizarre journey taken through "H", aided by a series of extraordinary maps, and his previous dealings with the mysterious Tulse Luper and the keeper of the bird house at the Amsterdam Zoo.
 

Comments

The Book of the Dead I honestly do not know of a more engaging film. This early work was greatly expanded in vision and changed from birth to death in the later (also early) `The Falls.' But to plumb that film you must fight tedium. Not so here. This is multilevel tour: of a museum, of the 92 drawings displayed therein, of the experiences in collecting the drawings. Each drawing is a map, so the tour is also of the journey taken. The narrator discusses the acquisitions and the journey as assisted by a Tulse Luper. But we learn that the purpose of the journey is for the narrator to be reborn as the ornathologist Tulse Luper. The maps, the avian companions, the music, and the narrated story meld perfectly. The 92 appears later in `The Falls,' also associated with birds, and in `ZOO' (4x23). The most important map comes from a birdcounter in the Amsterdam Zoo named Van Hoyten. It is from this person that the soul is stolen. He appears later in `ZOO' as now manager of that Zoo with no legs and a strange bias against black and white animals. At this writing, Greenaway is making a complex multimedia project called Tulse Luper's Suitcase, seemingly quite dense. The 92 appears there as well. It is a personal history of Uranium, whose atomic number is 92. >, I highly recommend that you seek out this film. I saw it on a compilation tape which included `Phones' and `Water Wrackets,' both clearly minor exercises.